Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 10th International Conference on Cancer Stem Cells and Oncology Research London, UK.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Michael Retsky

Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, USA

Keynote: Perioperative use of NSAID might prevent early relapses in breast and other cancers: An upstream approach

Time : 09:00-09:40

Oncology Research 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Michael Retsky photo
Biography:

Michael Retsky (PhD in Physics from University of Chicago) made a career change to cancer research thirty years ago.  He was on Judah Folkman’s staff at Harvard Medical School for 12 years. Retsky is Editor of a Nature/Springer book on breast cancer to be published in 2017. He is a founder and on the Board of Directors of the Colon Cancer Alliance and has published more than 60 papers in physics and cancer. He has a patent pending on treatment of early stage cancer.

Abstract:

A bimodal pattern of hazard of relapse among early stage breast cancer patients has been identified in multiple databases from US, Europe and Asia. We are studying these data to determine if this can lead to new ideas on how to prevent relapse in breast cancer.  Using computer simulation and access to a very high quality database from  Milan for patients treated with mastectomy only, we proposed that relapses within 3 years of surgery are stimulated somehow by the surgical procedure. Most relapses in breast cancer are in this early category. Retrospective data from a Brussels anesthesiology group suggests a plausible mechanism. Use of ketorolac, a common NSAID analgesic used in surgery was associated with far superior disease-free survival in the first 5 years after surgery. The expected prominent early relapse events in months 9-18 are reduced 5-fold. Transient systemic inflammation accompanying surgery (identified by IL-6 in serum) could facilitate angiogenesis of dormant micrometastases, proliferation of dormant single cells, and seeding of circulating cancer stem cells (perhaps in part released from bone marrow) resulting in early relapse and could have been effectively blocked by the perioperative anti-inflammatory agent. If this observation holds up to further scrutiny, it could mean that the simple use of this safe, inexpensive and effective anti-inflammatory agent at surgery might eliminate early relapses. We suggest this would be most effective for triple negative breast cancer and be especially valuable in low and middle income countries. Similar bimodal patterns have been identified in other cancers suggesting a general effect.

Keynote Forum

Karol Sikora

Proton Partners International Limited, UK

Keynote: The future place of protons in radiotherapy

Time : 09:40-10:20

Oncology Research 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Karol Sikora photo
Biography:

Karol Sikora is Chief Medical Officer of Proton Partners International. He was the founder of Cancer Partners UK which has created UK’s largest independent UK cancer network with private equity. He was Professor and Chairman of the Department of Cancer Medicine at Imperial College School of Medicine and is still honorary Consultant Oncologist at Hammersmith Hospital, London. He is Dean and Professor of Medicine at Britain’s first independent Medical School at the University of Buckingham and a Fellow of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. He has published over 300 papers and written or edited 20 books including Treatment of Cancer - the standard British postgraduate textbook, now in its sixth edition. His new book for patients The street-wise patient’s guide to cancer survival has just been published.

Abstract:

Meaningful large scale randomized trials with protons versus photons are unlikely. Instead the pre-treatment comparison of PBT versus IMRT in individual patients using pre-set metrics of plan quality will be necessary for funding. This assessment would be made objectively by treatment planning software systems. Payers, both government and insurers, will use these criteria to assess the value of PBT in an individual using a comparative equation incorporating tumor control, late toxicity and overall lifetime costs of care. Such analyses will determine the level of the therapeutic plateau in the relationship of cost to clinical outcome gain. The range of published estimates varies enormously from 1.5% (UK, NHS) to 20% in the US. The majority of European strategic plans are assuming a 10-15% utilization of protons in patients treated with radical radiotherapy.

Keynote Forum

Diana Anderson

University of Bradford, UK

Keynote: An empirical assay for assessing genomic sensitivity and for improving cancer diagnostics

Time : 10:30-11:10

Oncology Research 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Diana Anderson photo
Biography:

Diana Anderson holds the established Chair in Biomedical Sciences at the University of Bradford. She obtained her first degree in the University of Wales and second degrees in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Manchester. She has 450+ peer-reviewed papers, 9 books, has successfully supervised 29 PhDs, and been a Member of Editorial Boards of 10 international journals. She has been or is Editor in Chief of a book Series on toxicology for J. Wiley and sons and the Royal Society of Chemistry respectively. She gives key note addresses at various international meetings. She is a consultant for many international organizations, such as the WHO, NATO, TWAS, UNIDO and the OECD. 

Abstract:

Detection tests have been developed for many cancers, but there is no single test to identify cancer in general. We have developed such an assay. In this modified patented comet assay, we investigated peripheral lymphocytes of 208 individuals: 20 melanoma, 34 colon cancer, 4 lung cancer patients 18 suspect melanoma, 28 polyposis, 10 COPD patients and 94 healthy volunteers. The natural logarithm of the olive tail moment was plotted for exposure to UVA through different agar depths for each of the above groups and analyzed using a repeated measures regression model. Response patterns for cancer patients formed a plateau after treating with UVA where intensity varied with different agar depths. In comparison, response patterns for healthy individuals returned towards control values and for pre/suspected cancers were intermediate with less of a plateau. All cancers tested exhibited comparable responses. Analyses of receiver operating characteristic curves, of mean log olive tail moments, for all cancers plus pre/suspected-cancer versus controls gave a value for the area under the curve of 0.87; for cancer versus pre/suspected-cancer plus controls the value was 0.89 and for cancer alone versus controls alone (excluding pre/suspected-cancer), the value was 0.93. By varying the threshold for test positivity, its sensitivity or specificity can approach 100% whilst maintaining acceptable complementary measures. Evidence presented indicates that this modified assay shows promise as both a stand-alone test and as a possible adjunct to other investigative procedures, as part of detection programmes for a range of cancers.

Oncology Research 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Swee T Tan photo
Biography:

Dr Tan is the Director of the Gillies McIndoe Research Institute in Wellington, New Zealand. He completed medical training at Melbourne University in 1985, plastic surgery training in New Zealand in 1992, and gained a PhD from Otago University in 2001. In 1995, he was appointed Consultant Plastic & Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgeon at the Wellington Regional Plastic, Maxillofacial & Burns Unit at Hutt Hospital, where was the Director of Plastic Surgery 2000-2006 and Director of Surgery 2007-2013. He was appointed Professor in Plastic Surgery at Otago University in 2008. He is the Founder and Director of the Centre for the Study & Treatment of Vascular Birthmarks, a national referral centre. He has received numerous honours and awards and is well known internationally for his research into the stem cell basis of diseases including vascular anomalies and cancer. He is an author of over 140 publications and has delivered over 350 lectures at conferences.

Abstract:

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) makes up more than 90% of cancer affecting the oral cavity including the oral tongue, buccal mucosa, floor of mouth, retromolar trigone, hard palate, alveolus and the lip. Treatment of oral cavity SCC (OCSCC) typically involves surgical resection, often followed by radiotherapy, and sometimes biologic agents. Despite this radical treatment, the 5-year survival rate for SCC affecting most oral cavity subsites has remained at 50% for the past 4 decades. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in many types of cancers including OCSCC. Our recent data demonstrates the presence of 3 different putative CSC subpopulations within SCC of the oral tongue, buccal mucosa and lip. We have also demonstrated these CSC subpopulations express components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). We ahve also shown that the CSCs in one of these cancers studied (oral tongue SCC) also express the protease cathepsins B, D and G (CathG), suggesting the existence of potential bypass loops for the RAS. Our work suggests CSCs as a novel therapeutic target by modulation of the RAS using existing medications.

Keynote Forum

John Batchelor

Central Manchester Foundation Trust Manchester, UK

Keynote: The pathogenesis of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage in patients with haematological malignancy

Time : 11:50-12:30

Oncology Research 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker John Batchelor photo
Biography:

John Batchelor is currently Consultant in Emergency Medicine at Central Manchester Foundation Trust, England UK. He is also Honorary Lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University. He is graduated from Leeds University England in 1982. He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland and Fellow of the Faculty of Emergency Medicine of England. He undertook his MD thesis at University College London. He has written extensively on the subject of minor head injuries. He has presented a paper in Paris in 2012 on a meta-analysis looking at the relationship between cerebral micro bleeds and antiplatelet agents. He has also recently published a meta-analysis on the effect on mortality of platelet transfusions in adults with spontaneous or traumatic antiplatelet associated intracranial hemorrhage. His current research interest lies in the area of risk factors for intracranial hemorrhage in both adults and paediatrics secondary to coagulopathy and thrombocytopenia. 

Abstract:

Spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage is a well-recognized complication in patients with haematological disease. Intracranial hemorrhage is the second leading cause of death in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. The reported mortality is over 50% for patients with haematological malignancy and spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage. The reported incidence of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage appears to be slightly higher in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis than in other forms of homological malignancy. The distribution of ICH is as follows: Intraparenchymal hemorrhage accounts for about 60% of the reported case series. The remaining sites are distributed between the cerebellum, brainstem, and basal ganglia, subarachnoid, subdural, interventricular and epidural regions. Over 50% of patients will be having more than one intracranial bleeding site on CT. Previously proposed risk factors for spontaneous intracranial bleeding includes: Direct invasion by tumor cells, invasive intracranial sepsis, hyper leukocytosis, and coagulopathy. Abnormalities of clotting include DIC, thrombocytopenia and prolonged prothrombin time. Coagulopathy and thrombocytopenia are probably not the main factors responsible for spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage in view of the fact that neither platelets nor clotting factors are responsible for maintaining cerebral vessel integrity under normal physiological conditions. Cohort studies from patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenia have shown a poor correlation between platelet count and the risk of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage in both adults and children. Batchelor (2015) has shown that coagulopathy in patients with traumatic intracranial bleeding increases the risk of progressive hematoma progression by an odds ratio of 6.176 (95% CI: 4.727–8.069). This paper will explore other factors which may account for spontaneous ICH in patients with haematological malignancy. This paper will also explore the threshold for platelet transfusions in patients with haematological malignancy and thrombocytopenia based upon the current evidence.

  • Cancer Treatment and Therapeutics | Onco-Cardiology | Blood Cancer
Location: Waterfront 1
Speaker

Chair

Diana Anderson

University of Bradford, UK

Session Introduction

Arjun Ghosh

Barts Health NHS Trust, UK

Title: Cardio-oncology- What it is and why we need it?

Time : 12:30-13:00

Speaker
Biography:

Arjun Ghosh, MBBS, MRCP (UK), MRCP (Card), MSc, PhD, FHEA, is working as a Consultant Cardiologist at Barts Heart Centre (BHC), St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, London and at University College London Hospital (UCLH) is one of the first Cardiologists in the UK appointed specifically in Cardio-Oncology. He helped establish Cardio-Oncology services at both these hospitals. The services deal with screening for cardiotoxicity, monitoring patients on potentially cardiotoxic therapy and managing cardiac complications of cancer therapy. Patients are seen in clinics at BHC twice a week and once a week at UCLH. These clinics are one-stop with investigations (echocardiography, cardiac MRI etc.) on the day enabling rapid assessment and formation of a management plan on the day itself. Alongside the clinical service, Cardio-Oncology research is undertaken at both sites and there is a thriving educational component to the service with fellows from the UK and across the world. He has also established one of the first Cardio-Oncology MDTs in the world at BHC. He will explain the role of Cardio-Oncology in the management of cancer patients and expand on the Cardio-Oncology service models at BHC and UCLH.

 

Abstract:

Cardio-Oncology is an emerging specialty. It deals with the cardiac care of cancer patients in the most holistic sense. Screening, monitoring and intervention are the 3 key therapeutic initiatives in cancer patients exposed to potentially cardiotoxic chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Cardiotoxicity is a significant burden in those treated with anthracyclines and Trastuzumab and can complicate therapy with newer agents such as proteasome inhibitors. In addition, chemotherapy can result in arrhythmias, myocarditis, arterial and venous thromboembolism and hypertension while radiotherapy can lead to valve disease, pericarditis and diastolic and systolic dysfunction.

Adnan Yousif Rojeab

The London College UCK, UK

Title: A New Approach Strategy to Cure Cancer

Time : 14:00-14:30

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

The original of the cancer is a special mechanism which been created to eliminate the severe damage against the body, while the immune system is failing to cure the damages. The right method to vanish the action of the cancer is by applying a direct, right and simple treatment to those of previous diseases, which have caused to create the cancer, but without trying to treat the cancer itself. There is a similarity in lengthening characteristic of the telomere, in every replication of DNA, between the cancer cells and with those of stem and germ cells, where these cells are not forming a tissue. While in somatic cells, the telomere shortens in every DNA replication, which is by the action of remnant magnetisation. One other, possible, method to eliminate the cancer is, by, exposing the cancer cells to a suitable amount and direction of a magnetic field. This method is aimed in direction of inhibiting the lengthening of telomere, towards the characteristic of somatic cells.

Speaker
Biography:

Philip Savage is a Consultant Medical Oncologist in Brighton, UK. His Medical degree is from Bristol University and trained in Medical Oncology at the Royal Marsden and Hammersmith Hospitals in London. He previously specialised in the treatment of trophoblast and germ cell tumours whilst working at Charing Cross Hospital in London. He holds a PhD in tumour immunology from London University and has additional research interests in healthy economics and cancer treatment history.

Abstract:

Despite over 40 years of the ‘War on Cancer’ the list of metastatic malignancies that can be cured with drugs is unchanged from the 1970s. Whilst the paradigm of cancer cells being sensitive to DNA damaging chemotherapy as a result of rapid growth and then developing chemotherapy resistance and hence avoiding being killed is well established. We would like to present an alternate interpretation of the data and a new hypothesis. The new hypothesis relates to the biological properties of the chemotherapy curable cancers which comprise trophoblast tumours, germ cell tumours, acute leukemia, high grade lymphoma, and the rare childhood malignancies. Each of the chemotherapy curable malignancies arises from specialist cells that naturally undergo DNA manipulations that are intrinsically associated with high levels of endogenous apoptosis during development. Trophoblast tumours arise from the cells of conception, which have just undergone nuclear fusion. Germ cell tumours arise from pre-malignant precursor cells that are subject to pressures to undergo meiosis and mitosis. In the B cell malignancies, acute leukaemia that arises from cells linked to VDJ rearrangement of the immunoglobulin genes, whilst diffuse large B cell lymphoma which is closely linked to somatic hypermutation. Each of these unique genetic processes is naturally linked to a period of extreme sensitivity to DNA damage/apoptosis and we would argue that this apoptotic sensitivity is then maintained in the malignant cells arising at these developmental points. The other key biological characteristic the chemotherapy curable malignancies have is that their unusual developmental pathway means that they are not linked to any conventional hierarchical cancer stem cells. As a result, there is no pool of chemotherapy resistant stem cells available to replenish the tumour after treatment. Further pathway based research may be interesting and lead to novel therapeutic avenues.

Speaker
Biography:

Qamar Bashir has completed his PhD and Post-doctoral studies from Leiden University, The Netherlands. Currently, he is a Researcher at University of Oslo,
Norway. He has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals, with a cumulative impact factor of 76 and 340 citations.

Abstract:

Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is ubiquitously expressed enzyme with multiple functions. It belongs to the large TG2 family of eight
isozymes including blood coagulation factor XIII and TG1-7. TG2 is present in blood, extracellular matrix and intracellular
compartments. TG2 is primarily involved in deamidation of glutamine residues or covalent cross linking between glutamine and
lysine residues. TG2 induces wound healing, cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. It is thus involved in treatment of cancer, liver
diseases, diabetes, fibrosis, and neurodegeneration as well as inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. TG2 is centrally involved
in celiac disease by being the target for highly disease specific autoantibodies and by deamidating gluten epitopes for recognition
of pathogenic T cells and B cells. It has been demonstrated that TG2 utilizes itself as a substrate that leads to the formation of
TG2 multimers. Gluten peptides can be incorporated into the multimers, forming TG2-TG2-gluten complexes. Such multivalent
complexes are excellent antigens both for TG2-specific and deamidated gluten specific B cells and also to lead efficient activation of
gluten specific T cells. TG2 consists of an N-terminal domain, a catalytic core domain and two C-terminal domains. TG2 is a calcium
dependent enzyme and its activity is mediated by calcium binding to the core domain. Previous studies have reported the binding
of at least six calcium ions, out of which five have been located in the catalytic core domain. In the current study, we have identified
a calcium binding site at the first C-terminal domain. We have characterized TG2 self multimerization and found that it is mediated
by the calcium binding C1 domain. Our findings offer insight into the functional mechanism of TG2 and will help in development
of new and improved therapeutics.

Speaker
Biography:

Shahtaj Khan is an Assistant Professor of Hematology, and Head of the Department of Pathology at Hayatabad Medical Complex, Peshawar, Pakistan. She is also working as Consultant Hematologist at Rehman Medical Institute. Her research interests reflect in her wide range of publications in various national and
international journals.

Abstract:

Objective: The aim of the present study is to evaluate the frequency of childhood leukemias in the children from different districts of Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa (KP) and Afghanistan presenting to Hayat Abad Medical Complex Hospital, Peshawar.

Material & Method: This descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in Pathology department Hayat Abad Medical Complex hospital, Peshawar. Duration of the present study was, from January 2014 to December 2016. A total number of 605 children were enrolled up to 18 years of age, who suspected to have leukemia went through bone marrow examination by different department clinicians. 3 ml blood was collected in EDTA tube (purple top) and complete blood count was performed by hematology analyzer. By aseptic techniques bone marrow aspiration and bone marrow trephine biopsy samples were collected from all patients. Slides were papered from bone marrow aspirates, fixed with methanol and stained with Giemsa, myeloperoxidase and periodic acid Schiff stain. Trephine biopsy slides were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and reticuline stain. Immunohistochemistry was done after initially seeing of bone marrow aspirate slides. All data was documented and statistical analysis was performed by SPSS-20 software.

Results: Among 605 children, 173(61.6%) were males and 108(38.4) were females and their age range from 3 months to 18 years with median age of 9.8 years. In total children 281 (46.5%) were diagnosed different type of leukemias. Out of 281 cases, 208(74.03%) were diagnosed to have acute lymphoblastic leukemia and rest of the children were 61 (21.70%) acute myeloid leukemia, 7 (2.49%) chronic myeloid leukemia, 3 (1.07%) had juvenile chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (JCMML).

Conclusion: In the present study acute lymphoblastic leukemia were more prevalent leukemia in the children of Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa and Afghanistan. Juvenile chronic myelomonocytic leukemia was found less commonest leukemia in the present study. 

  • Young Research Forum (YRF)
Location: Waterfront 1
Speaker

Chair

Swee T Tan

Gillies McIndoe Research Institute, New Zealand

Session Introduction

Muhammad Uzair Rehman

Department of Physiology, Jinnah Medical and Dental College, Pakistan

Title: Evaluation of the effects of platelet rich plasma in regeneration of the spinal cord

Time : 16:10-16:30

Speaker
Biography:

Muhammad Uzair Rehman received his Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery from Liaquat National Hospital and Medical College Karachi, Pakistan. He is currently an MPhil Scholar at Dadabhoy Institute of Higher Education. In 2013-2014, he completed his House job at Abbasi Shaheed Hospital and Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre following which in November 2014 he joined Musavvir Stem Cell Clinic in the capacity of Research Associate. In January 2015, he took up the position of Lecturer at Jinnah Medical and Dental College finally parting ways in 2017 and taking up the post of Senior Lecturer at United Medical and Dental College. He is currently pursuing his MPhil in the field of Molecular Medicine and Medicinal Chemistry. His current research interests include Stem Cells, Platelet Rich Plasma, Platelet Rich Fibrin, Regenerative Medicine and Virology.

Abstract:

The purpose of study is to explore the efficacy and safety of platelet rich plasma (PRP) and adipose-derived stem cells in the non-operative management of shoulder tendinopathy amongst individuals with spinal cord injury. In this case in road traffic accidents that cause spinal injuries to the central nervous system, which increased morbidity and motility. The complications in patients were developed, resulting to a challenging problem for medicine. Platelet is the important component of blood which naturally holds the growth factors and cytokines. As a concentrated source of autologous platelets, PRP contains several different growth factors and other cytokines stimulating and healing of soft tissue. Platelet rich plasma therapy utilizes growth factors present in alpha granules of platelets in autologous adult stem cells reside in adult tissues and serve as the source for their specialized cells. In response to specific factors and signals, adult stem cells can differentiate and give rise to functional tissue specialized cells. In recent advancement in the field of regenerative medicine it was thought that this would grant a new approach to this problem, as it had proven beneficial in the repair of peripheral nerve injuries and their regeneration. This study was done to evaluate the effect of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) and adult stem cells (ASC) and its effect on the spinal cord post trauma. Subsequently, it was seen that PRP and ASC proved beneficial with marked positive effects in both muscle tone and muscle control and marked clinical improvement although it can still be said that further research must be done in this field.

Maria Fatima Ali

Department of Pharmacology, Jinnah Medical and Dental College, Pakistan

Title: Role of platelet rich plasma in repairing of non healing wounds and bones in clinical setup

Time : 16:30-16:50

Speaker
Biography:

Maria Fatima Ali received her Bachelor of Dental Surgery from Jinnah Medical and Dental College Karachi Pakistan. She is currently an MPhil scholar at Dadabhoy Institute of Higher Education. In 2014, she joined Hamdard University Dental Hospital where she did her House job following which in 2015 she joined the Department of Pharmacology as a Lecturer and later that year she took up the position of Research Associate at Musavvir Stem Cell Clinic. She is currently pursuing her MPhil degree in the field of Molecular Medicine and Medicinal Chemistry. Her current research interests include Stem Cells, Platelet Rich Plasma, Platelet Rich Fibrin and Regenerative Medicine.

Abstract:

PRP stands for Platelet Rich Plasma, which is a main component of a PRP stem cell injection. In the last few decades, thousands of patients have benefited from platelet rich plasma (PRP) therapies, emerging as a safe alternative in many different medical fields. The term is used very loosely to include anything that has growth factors and cytokines derived from blood (Platelets). When cells talk to each other, they make proteins and peptides that are the messages that pass from one cell to another and determine how the cell will respond. These are called cytokines and include growth factors. PRP stem cell injections for the knee, hip and spine use these cytokines to control the actions of surrounding cells. Platelets store granules of these cytokines that can be harvested and used. The use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in medicine has become increasingly more widespread during the last decade. Most studies on the subject are carried out in areas such as orthopedics, sports medicine, and odontology. Recently platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has also been used in the dermatologic and wound healing field, where PRP has been used in order to promote accelerated wound healing and as an adjuvant treatment in rejuvenation, alopecia, hair loss and even following laser sessions. The use of platelets was particularly fortuitous given that the main initial interest was to take advantage of the adhesive and haemostatic properties of the homologous fibrin during bone surgery. A realization of the clinical potential of PRP-therapies has also followed the positive clinical observations, such as enhanced bone formation and anti-inflammatory functions, during oral and maxillofacial applications. PRP seems to have a role to play in the treatment of extra-articular symptoms.

Maria Mufti

Princess Nourah bint Abdulrahman University, KSA

Title: Stem cell donation decision in Saudi Arabia: Factors and attitudes

Time : 16:50-17:10

Speaker
Biography:

Maria Mufti is a third year Medical student at Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University. She graduated from Al-Rowad High School in 2012 with percentage of 98 and finished four years in Medical College. She had her first Medical Research about stem cells and stem cells donation: factors and attitudes in 20162017. She had courses such as: English course at Alfaisal Universal Academy with a grade of 90 at the 6th level; other is self-development and problem solving and much other Medicine related courses. Her good attendance at English classes made her eligible to take the IELTS exam with grade of 5.5. She is interested in volunteering community services regularly, as she volunteered once to be a photographer for orphan children, she volunteered also in recovering from cancer day as a speaker about cancer awareness, also she was four times a volunteer at campaigns of stem cell donation center at King Faisal Hospital taking swabs and register donors.

Abstract:

Background: Stem cells (SC) transplantation becomes the base line management in many diseases. The SC donors’ number is still insufficient to cover the SC transplants’ needed number. Encouraging adults to be SC donors is the main donation concern.

Objective: The objective of the study is to identify the factors affecting Saudi population’s attitudes concerning SC donation.

Materials & Method(s): This is a case control study with a 600 questionnaires filled by Saudi participants aged between 18-50 years in SC donation campaign, King Faisal Hospital, Riyadh.

Result(s): 300 males and 300 females with mean age of 29.24 ±9.32 years were included. Although 41.7% of participants were aware about SC, 93% of them had bad knowledge score. 67.3% were registered in SC donation campaign as a donor while 15.5% of participants had knowledge about Saudi SC donation centers. A significant difference was found between registered and non-registered participants regarding many factors e.g. age, education level and knowledge score (P value≤0.05). The main encouraging positive attitude was relieving patient’s pain (65.3%) while the main negative one was considering SC donation as unsafe procedure (35%).

Conclusion(s): The majority of Riyadh’s population accepted the idea of SC donation and registered in stem cell donation campaign; however, there was lack of knowledge about SC and Saudi donation centers.

Recommendations: Awareness strategies are urgently needed to enhance population’s SC knowledge, clarify the role of Saudi stem cell donation centers and improve their attitude by correcting wrong ideas.

Speaker
Biography:

Monica Dzwigala is a 5th year student of Faculty of Medicine at the Warsaw Medical University, Poland. In 2011, she received her Master of Science degree from the Warsaw School of Economics. From 2015, she started taking part in projects carried out by Students' Scientific Group in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology under the supervision of Assoc. prof. Ewa Romejko-Wolniewicz (Chief of Department Krzysztof Czajkowski PhD, MD) and she is also involved in basic research working in the Translative Platform for Regenerative Medicine, Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences under supervision of Anna Sarnowska PhD, MD (Chief of the Platform of Regenerative Medicine in Polish Academy of Sciences). She is interested in the Stem Cell Biology field, especially human mesenchymal stem cells, human placenta stem cells, human breast stem cells and cervical cancer stem cells. In the area of obstetrics and gynecology, she is involved in the research concerning pregnancy programing, intrauterine infection, amniotic fluid microbiome, pregnancy diabetes and hypertension, perinatology.

Abstract:

Human breast milk consists of different types of cells: leukocytes, epithelial cells, fibroblasts and pericytes. The aim of this study was to confirm presence of stem/progenitor cells in human milk, to evaluate their pluripotent and regenerative potential and to test correlation between mother, infant and number of cells in human milk. Fresh milk samples were acquired from women 0-7 days post-delivery. The consent according to the Ethics Committee of Warsaw Medical University guideline was obtained from each woman. The samples were collected manually or by breast pump from 47 mothers. Cells isolation was performed within 4 hours after sample collection. Various types of media were used in cells culture (MammoCult, DMEM + 10% FBS and others). Cells were characterized by flow cytometry (FC), RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Health status of the mother and the child was estimated. Anthropometric data was obtained from patients’ history. Stem/progenitor cells present in human milk displayed heterogeneous expression of pluripotency genes characteristic for human embryonic stem cells such as: transcription factors OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG. No statistical relationship was found between number of cells in human milk and any of the following: previous surgical procedures, marital status, smoking during pregnancy, regular or irregular menstruation cycle, child’s sex and others. Negative correlation (r=-0.5384, p<0.0012) was found between the day of sample collection and the number of milk cells. The study confirms presence of stem/progenitor cells in human breast milk and the correlations might argue the decreasing number of cells in human breast milk during first week from delivery.

Jeehyun Yoe

Pohang University of Science and Technology, Korea

Title: Capicua regulates self-renewal and tumour progression of breast cancer cells

Time : 17:30-17:50

Speaker
Biography:

Jeehyun Yoe is a PhD candidate with particular interests in Stem Cell and Cancer Biology. Her current research has 2 aims: 1) to better understand the role of CIC in tumourigenic process in different cellular contexts and environments and 2) to further identify the molecular mechanisms that regulate CSC characteristics. Prior to enrolling at POSTECH for the combined MS and PhD program, she graduated with a BS in Biology and minors in Chemistry and Music from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA.

Abstract:

Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are capable of tumour initiation and growth, and play a critical role in metastasis, therapeutic resistance, and disease recurrence in breast tumours. Therefore, if cancer arises and is maintained by the small population of CSCs within the bulk tumours, it is of central importance that definitive marker genes for CSCs are identified and regulatory mechanisms that promote stem cell maintenance be understood. Here, we show that the developmentally regulated HMG-box protein Capicua (CIC) is a transcriptional repressor that suppresses CSC properties in both the luminal and basal/myoepithelial subtypes of breast cancer cells. Mammosphere formation in culture was used to reveal stem cell properties, where expression of CIC was consistently down regulated in primary mammospheres in comparison to parental adherent cells then in secondary mammospheres upon serial passage. Knockdown of CIC increased mammosphere formation, while CIC overexpression prevented mammosphere formation, effect dependent on continuous CIC expression. Furthermore, CIC knockdown MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells contained a higher percentage of EpCAM+/CD44+/CD24low/ cancer-initiating cells than in control cells grown as monolayer cultures and propagated as mammospheres. Loss of CIC relieved repression of PEA3 group genes, especially ETV4, which was necessary and sufficient for driving mammosphere formation. Moreover, we observed upregulation of the pluripotency-associated transcriptional factor SOX2 in MCF7 CIC knockdown cells and demonstrated significant rescue effect on mammosphere formation following SOX2 knockdown in CIC knockdown cells. Therefore, we propose CIC as a potential biomarker of breast cancer stem cells and a novel target in stem cell and cancer therapy.